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What are some of the most deadly jobs in the United States?

Not all jobs are created equally when it comes to safety. For example, the inherent nature of work such as construction lends itself to higher risks of injury and death, but strict safety standards can help minimize the dangers. Here's a look at some of the most deadly jobs in America.

Construction worker

The good news first: Demand for workers in construction is high and should grow through 2024 by a healthy 13 percent. Now for the bad news: Construction is an extremely dangerous field, with factors such as workers getting stuck between equipment, objects or material; being electrocuted; falling; and getting hit by an object, contributing to many deaths every year. In fact, out of every five workers who died in 2014, one worked in construction.

Logging worker

Logging is the most dangerous field to work in if you measure danger by the proportion of fatal injuries. For example, for every 100,000 people, there are 110.9 fatalities among logging workers. Compare this with the 17.9 figure for construction supervisors and the 16.9 figure for construction laborers. However, the overall number of logging deaths is lower than it is in construction because fewer people work as loggers.

Drivers/truck drivers

Speaking of total numbers of fatalities, drivers and truck drivers are way up there, with 880 overall deaths in 2014, which translates to 24.7 deaths per 100,000 people. This category does not even include taxi drivers, but theirs is a deadly profession as well. They experience 18 deaths per 100,000 people, or 68 total in 2014.

Maintenance workers

This one may be surprising to some people but should become less so once you consider the machines and equipment many maintenance people work with. Sixty-eight people in maintenance died in 2014 for a total of 14.4 fatalities per 100,000 people.

Farmers and agricultural workers

All of that machinery can be dangerous for farmers, just as construction machinery can be deadly for construction laborers. Farmers, agricultural managers and ranchers saw 270 deaths in 2014 and 26.7 fatalities per 100,000 people.

Fishers and related occupations

Logging is the most deadly profession when you analyze the numbers proportionally; fishing is the second most deadly. For every 100,000 people, 80.8 die; in 2014, this translated to a total of 22 deaths.

In many cases, workplace deaths (and injuries) can be prevented, as employer negligence or negligence on the part of another party can contribute to them. If you or a loved one has been affected by possible neglect, consulting an attorney can ensure your rights are upheld.

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